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New research looks at disaster recovery and data backup methods in US small businesses

Carbonite Inc. has reported on new research into the disaster recovery and data backup methods being used by US small businesses.

In April 2011, Carbonite surveyed more than 125 small businesses with between two and 20 employees. This found that 48 percent of respondents had experienced data loss, up from 42 percent from a similar survey in December 2010.

The top causes of small business' data loss included hardware/software failure (54 percent), accidental deletion (54 percent), computer viruses (33 percent) and theft (10 percent).

Although 31 percent of small business owners surveyed agree that backing up their company's computers is a hassle that takes time away from running their business, the research indicated that physical devices were the most prominent backup methods used by small businesses. Specifically, external hard drives (41 percent), CDs/DVDs (36 percent) and USB/flash memory sticks (36 percent) were reported as the three most-popular ways SMBs back up data.

While many SMBs recognize that online backup solutions offer significant advantages over traditional physical-device backups – the research indicates that those who do not backup to the cloud cited cost as the number one factor in their decision.

www.carbonite.com

•Date: 19th July 2011 • Region: US •Type: Article • Topic: ICT continuity

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