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Tape Summit summary

The role of tape in the enterprise is changing and the major vendors are responding to new opportunities such as the rise of big data. These are some of the themes which emerged from the European Tape Summit held at SNW Europe 2012 in Frankfurt recently.

The initial results of a survey, the Tape Audit Europe, were published at the Summit, giving a snapshot of tape storage usage. This indicates that the average European enterprise backs-up around 90TB of data with 38 percent of these companies using tape as their main medium.

The rise of big data analytics is set to have a ‘massive effect’ on the amount of storage required. The secret of good analytical information is having a rich store to draw from and this will drive companies to retain more data. IDC asserts that the world's digital information is doubling every two years and that by 2020 storage needs will have increased by 50 times on 2011 levels.

Much of this data will be archived and the question is which technology is best for long-term retention. Already 53.4 percent of enterprises surveyed retain their tape data for over three years and more companies are likely to increase storage retention with the adoption of big data software.

There has been a rise in use of disk arrays to replace tape for disaster recovery backups. This is partially due to disk vendors emphasizing perceived speed advantages of disk and the falling cost of hard drives. However, according to the European Tape Audit Survey, 29.2 percent of companies still expect to be committing over 50 percent of their data to tape in five years’ time. One reason for this is that tape costs are still significantly less than disk. Even a cent difference (per GB) may not seem much, but at current prices this means a saving of $1,000 for the average backup size. In addition, raw tape speed is actually much faster than disk; and current tapes have an estimated life of 30 years which is far longer, and more reliable, than storage on mechanical hard disks which are expected to last for between three and five years at best.

http://www.theExecEvent.com

•Date: 7th Nov 2012 • World •Type: Article • Topic: ICT continuity

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